We have rolled out another great feature for our artists, and I’m excited to tell you about it.

You can now customize a slide-out ad that will show up when your music plays on Earbits, providing listeners with a way to click through to any promotion you have going. Whether you are looking for votes in a contest, selling a new album, giving away a free download, or any other number of uses, these ads are a great way to engage with your fans.

Custom Promo Ads for Artists on Earbits

You can access the slide-out promo ad by logging in to your artist dashboard (https://dashboard.earbits.com/dashboard/login), and setting it up is simple:


One of the perks of having your music on Earbits Radio, is a built-in mailing list that collects the email addresses of new fans, helping you expand your listener-base by engaging with them. The email addresses/data you accumulate are yours to add to your official mailing list, turning them into real fans and customers. That means you are going to need a game-plan for marketing to them on your own. Below are a few tips that should help you convert these new fans into loyal followers:

  1. Add them to your list right away and send them a note thanking them for joining your list. You might want to look into a mail service, such as Mailchimp.com.

It’s easy to hear that there is a film about Hendrix with no original music from the man himself and scoff…there’s no way that kind of story could be interesting, purposeful, or even remotely compelling. But in an oddball, aloof, alluring way (maybe much like Jimi himself), “Jimi: All Is By My Side” is one of the most compelling music related biopics I’ve ever seen. But it’s not without damning flaws that are impossible to dismiss.

Today’s article is written by Daniel Faris. Daniel Faris is a freelance writer and a graduate of Susquehanna University’s Writers Institute. When he’s not blogging here, you can join him over at New Music Friday for conversations about progressive music.

As far as I’m concerned, the concept album represents a pinnacle of human creativity. It’s one thing to write an album’s worth of captivating music, but it’s another thing entirely to then tie each song together with a common story or lyrical theme.

Today’s article is written by Daniel Faris.  Daniel Faris is a freelance writer and a graduate of Susquehanna University’s Writers Institute. When he’s not blogging here, you can join him over at New Music Friday for conversations about progressive music.

If you’ve ever had a bad day and felt better after listening to a favorite song, you’ve already experienced firsthand the therapeutic power of music. It’s something we’ve all experience at one time or another, but what’s the science behind this phenomenon?

Music therapy is still in the early days in terms of becoming an officially recognized science, but it’s definitely gaining ground. Read on for a brief look at what music therapy is, as well as some of the surprising ways it’s helping people live and feel better.

Dear friends, listeners, artists and labels,

It has been one hell of a week, and we could not be more excited to bring you some truly unbelievable news.

On Friday, we announced that we had run out of funding and would be shutting down the Earbits service.  We received countless emails from artists and listeners showing their support for the Earbits vision, and they spoke up on Twitter and across the web.  Unfortunately, we had no choice but to go offline two days ago.

To our Earbits Listeners, Artists, and Labels,

It is with heavy hearts that we must announce the shutting down of the Earbits service on June 16th.

Shutting down a company after 4.5 years is going to be painful for anybody but is particularly painful for us here at Earbits.  Most startups validate over the course of a few years that their concept is inherently flawed, or that the economics of it would not work out at scale.  For Earbits, nothing could be further from the truth.  We proved to ourselves and a substantial number of artists and listeners that our concept does work, that our vision is what the industry and larger streaming providers need to be doing in order to create more value, but that we simply needed a lot more capital to pursue such an aggressive mission properly.  In trying to build a digital media, two sided marketplace in an already tough industry, it appears we bit off more than we could chew.

At some point, somewhere, someone went through every Nicolas Cage movie and edited together only the parts where he was screaming. At another point, someone else went through every Aaron Sorkin film and TV show and edited together tons of similar phrases. Sometimes, from a massive library of work, we only want certain parts.  The internet can make that happen.

If you’ve always wanted an album that combines every time Q-Tip and Busta Rhymes have appeared on a song together as well as new material from the two hip-hop legends, then you have both strange desires and good taste, and that material has arrived in the form of a free, downloadable .zip file.

Four Tet and Burial, the good guys of the underground UK electronic music scene, are finally having their moment.  A Four Tet show at Los Angeles venue the Echoplex scheduled for March sold out so quickly that promoters FYF added another night.  Both make dark, scathing intricately produced music, both have become hugely popular for it, and both still act like regular dudes.  Burial’s Wikipedia page describes an interview where he said “I’m a lowkey person and I just want to make some tunes.”

Former Weezer bassist Matt Sharp’s band The Rentals has found a new home at Polyvinyl Records, one of the many awesome record labels you can find on Earbits Radio. As a result of the new pairing, Polyvinyl and The Rentals are scheduled to release a new album sometime during 2014. This marks the group’s first album in 15 years.

Sharp was one of the founding members of Weezer, and his influence over that group’s sound is evident in the style played by The Rentals. It’s infectious power-pop fun undermined by a sense of darkness and seriousness. Lots of catchy ooh ooh’s and big, arena-style power chords. It’s a shame that the band didn’t produce more work and follow Weezer along its evolutionary path.