Tag Archive: dubstep

This is a guest post by Marcus Taylor, founder of Venture Harbour, a digital marketing agency that specializes in working with brands in the entertainment industries.

Collectively, Google and Facebook probably own more data on market supply and demand patterns than anyone else. What many people do not realize is that much of this data is publicly available. For a bit of fun I decided to see what patterns I could find about the music industry in Google and Facebook’s pool of user behavior data.

 

#1 Less people want to buy music, but the same amount are trying to sell it.

I tend to keep my mouth shut when it comes to electronic dance music, particularly dubstep.  My history with that particular subgenre is somewhat similar to many other people my age:  I heard a song, thought it was one of the coolest and most different sounding things I’ve ever heard, listened to a few other songs that gave me a similar response, listened to more songs until the build-up-then-bass-wobble formula wore thin, and then left the music for people who consider staying out all night and dancing to crazy light-shows a good time.  Not my scene.

Anyone who has experimented with mind-altering substances will tell you that most of them enhance (or at least affect) the experience of listening to music.  Those who play music well enough to do so under the influence will often tell you that drugs enhance your creativity and ability to dream up new music, too.  In particular, you often see bands or people who write incredibly inventive music during periods of drug abuse, and then become incredibly boring and stale when they sober up (although there are a lot of reasons that might happen).  At any rate, I don’t think many people will argue that drugs have no affect whatsoever on making music, or on your experience listening to it.

Plenty of albums to choose from in December’s first batch of new releases.

Amy Winehouse— Lioness: Hidden Treasures

Amy Winehouse’s posthumous album of rarities, demos and b-sides.  Portions of the album sales are set to be donated to the Amy Winehouse Foundation.

Dia Frampton— Red

I watched a few episodes of NBC’s The Voice and took a particular interest in Dia Frampton, a girl with an intriguing and powerful vocal style.  It wasn’t until I began reading reviews of the singer’s debut solo album, Red, that I realized Dia is one half of rock band Meg & Dia.  Pretty cool.