Tag Archive: new music releases

Barons of Hiddenhausen, is a mysterious and hidden secret, with it’s origins in Vienna.  Although the project sounds like a full-fledged band, the mastermind behind the project is one person: Moritz Kofler.  Kofler is no stranger to the genre – after he recorded “World Withdrawal,”  he collaborated with Digital Noise Academy in L.A., a project by Ken Andrews (Failure, Beck, A.P.C. NIN), Jordon Zadorozny (Blinker The Star, Courtney Love, Melissa Auf Der Maur) and others. That experience shows in this record.

Listen to Barons of Hiddenhausen on Earbits

It’s been a while since rock music has sounded the way Stars In Stereo plays it.  The group approaches its songs with a firm grasp on gritty rock instincts as well as a innate understanding of clean pop sensibilities.  The main attribute of Stars In Stereo, the band’s recently released self-titled album, is that its particular style is difficult to pin down.  It’s not totally heavy and not totally soft, but more a combination of the two than some strange middle-ground.

Listen to Stars In Stereo on Earbits

Rabbit & The Hare is proof that good things can happen on Craigslist.  The band formed after singer/songwriter Neill MacCallum posted an ad in NYC’s section of the website in search of a “female multi-instrumentalist.”  Marisa Duchowny, a person that happens to fit both of those requirements, also happened to read and respond to that post.  Just like that, with the strange power of the internet, a duo was born.  Marisa became the Rabbit, Neill the Hare.

Listen to Rabbit & The Hare on Earbits!

Three Of Swords, by Mimi, an eclectic Singer-Songwriter from Toronto, begins with a song called “Goodbye Heartbeat.”  The track contains soft-spoken, airy vocals with varying rhythms and melodies over a frantically pulsating bass line.  An acoustic guitar plucks along steadily.  The song has a dreamy, ethereal quality that’s consistent throughout it’s nearly 4-minute run-time.

Listen to Mimi on Earbits

That pleasant tone is maintained throughout the rest of the album, although the ways in which Mimi delivers her songs greatly vary in style and arrangement.  The second track on the album, for instance, is rife with Latin flair— propelled by a cornet part played by Patric McGroarty and spot-on use of Spanish-language vocals.  The song is entitled “Porque Te Vas,” and it’s a cover of José Luis Perales’ 1972 song of the same name (originally performed by Jeanette).

by Charles Rojas | Metal/Hard Rock Manager, Earbits.com

Nowadays, you’ll find most Hard Rock bands trying to outdo one another by playing the same guitar riffs louder than each other. It’s an endless sea of Rock n Roll cliches and a lack of originality. Amazingly, Los Angeles natives Rooftop Revolutionaries have managed to rise above the noise and pose a unique brand of sound. 2013 is seeing the release of their new album, Resolute.

Listen to Rooftop Revolutionaries on Earbits

Be Brave Bold Robot’s album Under A Thin Veil Of Madness begins with a track dedicated to the narrator (presumably lead vocalist Dean Haakenson)’s mother.  The song, aptly titled “Mamasong,” includes lines that demonstrate appreciation for parents like “I do everything I do, cuz I watched you do it first / and growing up is never easy, but it could’ve been far worse.

Listen to Be Brave Bold Robot on Earbits

While the song is a charming and lovely tribute to the way Haakenson’s mother raised him, listeners of Be Brave Robot should thank the lady, too.  After all she’s the woman responsible for birthing an immensely talented and delightfully strange folk singer from Sacramento, CA.

I find myself being rude but can’t help it.

He’s come back from the kitchen with more wine and my thumbs move as quickly as one bottle down will allow, hurriedly taking note of the conversation highlights. There are many. Philosophical musings bounce around like a coked out game of pong in my brain, intermingling with political discussion, movie quotes and the awesomeness of wine. I get enough shorthand into my phone to feel satisfied and gladly take another glass. It’s probably been upwards of three hours, noted only by the kink in my back from the wooden folding chair.

There are a lot of really exciting albums that are scheduled to be released tomorrow.  Check ’em out below.

Arbouretum— Coming Out Of The Fog

A new album from the rock group, released via Thrill Jockey.

Bad Religion— True North

The punk band’s SIXTEENTH album.

Big Harp— Chain Letters

The second LP from this L.A. based duo, via Saddle Creek.

Brokeback— Brokeback And The Black Rock

A new album from the Douglas McComb’s project.

Diamond Youth— Orange

by Tyler Hayes

Never once have I uttered the words “Funky fresh,” but with Wooster‘s album, If All The Dew Were Diamonds, it’s the only phrase that comes to mind, immediately describing the music. The album is definitely a genre bender and a great example of a band accurately throwing in hints of multiple styles, while never over saturating a particular taste.

Listen to Wooster on Earbits Radio

The “Intro” to Background Music, L.A. hip-hop duo Substance Abuse’s second album, begins with an trippy mashup of soundclips that includes quips like “Substance Abuse presents problems without presenting solutions,” “they team up with other MCs,” and “they sound like 1998.” These clips, although smashed together quickly and barely coherent,accomplish the same thing B. Rabbit did in 8 Mile’s final battle scene— they bring forth potential flaws before critics have a chance to mention them.

Listen to Substance Abuse on Earbits Radio