Tag Archive: spotify

Songwriting is more than a melody. It’s more than a few chords and words. Songwriting is more than stories about losing and finding love, and it’s more than whatever gets you through the night. Songs are the catalyst that have brought people together across the globe for generations. Songs and those who craft them are meant to ignore, cross and obliterate barriers – bridging the gaps we’ve created over the centuries: race…religion…language…nationality…

by Tyler Hayes

Everyday there’s a new service, a new site, something remixing two different things to be the thing of a different thing. What is Instagram? It’s the Twitter of pictures. What is Hulu? It’s the Netflix of TV. You get the idea. Everyday there’s a new music service that threatens to be the savior of the industry. The service that, with just enough users, could change everything. Too often though, promises are made only to be broken later. So, which music service are worth getting excited about, which ones may actually change things? The results may surprise you.

Yesterday Facebook announced their long-anticipated Facebook Music platform, which is part of their greater move toward incorporating your app activity into your Facebook experience, and your Timeline – their newest overview of a person’s life from beginning to…well…end.

It seems they’re still rolling things out but most people should have access to one or two great music services from within the Facebook Music App Page, and the cool Facebook integration that comes with it.  To help make things easier, we’ve got a tutorial for you.

What is Facebook Music?

A short comment about Spotify on my Facebook wall, from a well respected musician friend of mine, sparked a long debate between us.  The argument of my friend was that people are stealing music and will keep doing so.  He realizes that the rates paid to musicians by Spotify are a joke, but his argument is that it’s better than not getting paid at all.  What bothered me most about this debate was not my friend’s opinion about Spotify’s business model, it’s his acceptance of the fact that stealing music is a norm, and that there’s nothing to be done about it.

I’ll just skip to the chase. I think Spotify is a disaster for the music industry and here’s why.

Search for “spotify piracy” on Google and you will see that they have done a fantastic job painting a rosy picture as being an alternative to piracy.  Truth is, they probably are.  The restrictions on the free version are bearable enough for anybody who prefers not to break the law to put up with, and $5 a month for no ads pretty much means you can listen to whatever you want without breaking the law and without advertisements.  Alternative to piracy?  For most users, I believe it.

Well, it’s been a few days since Spotify landed in the US.

Let me check…is Pandora still there?  Yep.  Whew!

What about iTunes?  Hmm.  That’s weird.  The US music world at large seems unscathed.

While Spotify probably got an unprecedented amount of initial signups thanks to their ongoing, pre-launch PR dream/nightmare, the real question is, are they different enough, more savvy at marketing, or just plain luckier than all of the on-demand music services that America already has to offer?

Are they going to live up to the hype?

Spotify vs. the US Competition

Honestly, if you follow digital music at all, you’ve been hearing about the impending emergence of Spotify on US soil since 1843.  At this point, you may mistakenly hear Sarah Palin say that Paul Revere’s famous midnight ride was to warn US music companies of Spotify’s arrival.  (Seriously, is it that different than what she really said?)

For the last week we’ve been hearing that not only have they closed deals with 3 of the 4 major labels, but “at least one Spotify executive claims Warner Music Group is in the bag,” as reported by Digital Music News.